July 14, 2014

What are the Duties of a Day Care Center as to Inspection and Maintenance of the Playground? (Dangers of Rope, Twine, and Cords)

By David Wolf, Attorney
Published by Child Injury Lawyer Network

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Proper maintenance and supervision are essential for the safety of children in school, day care, summer camp, and other locations. There have been reports of children suffering serious injuries even dying as a result of items being left in and around the playground. Two recent incidents involved the strangulation of a child in a playground. One was strangulated by a jump rose and the other was strangulated by some type rope or twine. If the items were not left in the playground area and / or there was proper supervision in place, the incidents would have likely been prevented.

These tragic deaths and other injuries are valuable lessons for the all summer camps, day care centers, and schools. Of course, lessons taught and learned should not be at the expense, pain, or suffering a child or his family. Supervision and maintenance are vital to the safety and welfare of our children. Children, especially those who are pre-school and elementary school age, do not recognize the dangers of their actions or the actions of their playmates. If children had good judgment and always acted reasonably, then there would not be much of a need for supervision or maintenance at all. However, as we should all know, children lack property safety awareness and need that certain level of supervision and guidance by responsive adults who serve as child care providers.

Supervision would have prevented the child from engaging in dangerous activity of wrapping a string, cord, or jump rope around the neck which led to the disastrous consequences. Because of these and other incidents, it is important that day care centers, schools, and supervisors of playground areas be inspected during the day to make sure that the playground equipment is well-maintained, there is no debris or other dangerous items left behind, and that dedicated and undistracted supervision is in place for the safety of children.

Playgrounds are usually locations were children have fun and spend time with their friends and family. Unfortunately for some children and their families, a playground can be the location where the child took his or her last breath.

When a child is injured as a result of the neigence or carelessness of a school, day care center, business government entity or other child care provider, it is important for a parent to seek legal advice. A Child Injury Lawyer can provide that necessary direction for parent and the during the most trying times in the aftermath of a serious personal injury or tragic wrongful death of a child. The book - The ABCs of Child Injury - Legal Rights of the Injured Child - What Every Parent Should Know - has chapters on Automobile Accidents, Day Care Center Injuries, School Injuries, Theme Park and Attraction Injuries, and other topics. You can get this book for free at The ABCs of Child Injury.

It should be noted when there is a death of a child there is no word in the English language for the aftermath of the tragedy. When a spouse dies, the surviving spouse is a widow or widower. When both parents die, a child is referred to as an ophran. However, when a chldies unnaturally and decades before the child should, there is a hole left in the hearts of the family, friends, and community. No legal case and no amount of compensation can ever replace a child. This sentence should be repeated again. No legal case and no amount of compensation can ever replace a child. However, the law does recognize a cause of action and, at times, the right and just cause of action should be taken to compensate the grieving parents for their loss and to send a message of sorts that children should be cared for property and when that level of care fails - action should and will be taken.

October 3, 2013

What is the Statute of Limitations to Bring a Case On Behalf of an Injured Child in the State of Washington?

By David Wolf, Attorney
Published by Child Injury Lawyer Network

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In the State of Washington, children are the unfortunate victims of personal injuries that are caused by automobile accidents, bicycle accidents, pedestrian accidents, playgroud injuries, school injuries, and other incidents. When a child is injured, a parent is faced with many challenges in dealing with the medical care, insurance issues, and, yes, legal issues that may arise in any given case. When a child is injured, it is important for a parent to stay calm and get the support of family and friends when getting through this most difficult period for the child and the immediate family. A Child Injury Lawyer can help guide the parent through the maze of issues and challenges that present themselves in most cases.

One issue that should be addressed up front is that of timing. What is the Statute of Limitations to Bring a Case on Behalf of an Injured Child in the State of Washington? Fortunately, the legislators in the State of Washington passed a law that gives plenty of time to bring an action. Under Washington Law, the Statute of Limitations for a child injury does not begin to run until the child reaches the age of 18. This means that a parent, in most instances, has years of time to pursue a legal claim or case on behalf of an injured child. While there is plenty of time to bring forth a case, it is advisable to act promptly when a child is injured. By waiting years upon years to pursue a case, documents otherwise available are lost or destroyed. Witness memories fade and businesses go under and insurance policies lapse. Because most consultations for child injury cases are fre

December 14, 2012

Is a School, Day Care Center, After School Program, or Camp Liable for Injuries to a Child Who Fell from Monkey Bars?

By David Wolf, Attorney Published by Child Injury Lawyer Network

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Most playgrounds throughout virtually every community have monkey bars. While monkey bars are quite common, they are still dangerous especially for young children climbing on or transversing monkey bars in a playground. It takes a certain strength, dexterity, skill, and endurance to climb across monkey bars from one side of the playground to another. Because of this, children frequently fall from monkey bars to the ground of the playground area. Most falls are uneventful. The child merely brushes off the mulch, dirt, or other ground cover and then continues playing with friends on the playground. Unfortunately for some children, a fall from monkey bars can result in serious personal injuries including fractures, sprains, lacerations, and head injuries.

As a Child Injury Lawyer, I am often asked if the parents of an injured child can pursue a case or claim on behalf of the injured child for injuries sustained as a result from a fall from monkey bars. Is a school, day care center, after school program, or camp liable for injuries related to a fall from monkey bars? The answer to this question is "it depends." Injuries resulting from a fall from monkey bars is often defended on the grounds that the monkey bars are common and there is no way to prevent every single accident or incident that takes place on a playground. Defendants argue that it is impractical and expensive to post an employee, counselor, aide, or other adult directly under the monkey bars for the entirety of the play time period.

There are a number of factors that are considered when evaluating a potential legal claim or case involving a fall from monkey bars. They include the following:

age of the child;
size of the child;
abilities of the child;
manufacturer recommendations as to age for children using playground equipment;
maintenance of playground equipment;
prior incidents of falls from monkey bars resulting injuries;
number of children playing on the playground;
capacity (number of children) on the playground;
number of adult supervisors posted in or around playground; and
other factors.

It can be challenging for a parent dealing with the aftermath of a child injury caused by a playground accident, automobile accident, school injury, or other cause. The book titled - The ABCs of Child Injury - Legal Rights of the Injured Child - What Every Parent Should Know - has chapters on Playground Injuries, Sports Related Injuries, Automobile Accidents, Medical Bills and Treatment, and other topics. You can get this book for free at The ABCs of Child Injury.

November 28, 2012

What Supervision is Recommended During Playground Play by the U.S. Safety Consumer Product Safety Commission?

By David Wolf, Attorney
Published by Child Injury Lawyer Network

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The U.S. Product Safety Commission publishes guidelines and recommendations for the set up, maintenance, and supervision of children in playgrounds in the publication - Public Playground Safety Handbook. Because playgrounds are present in virtually every school, community, day care center, and park, it is important that guidelines and recommendations are considered and followed when reasonable and practical to do so.

As noted in the Handbook, not all playground equipment is suitable for a particular age group or for children using or having access to the playground site. In order to determine if a playground is appropriate for a certain age group. The following guidelines are set forth in the Handbook:

Toddlers (Children in this group range in age from 6 months old to 23 months old.)
Playground equipment should include ramps, stairways, and swings with bucket seats. If ladders are in place, ladders should be single file / person ladders. Climbing equipment should be under 32 inches high.

Pre-School (Children in this group range in age from 2 years old to 5 years old.)
If ladders are in place, ladders should be single file ladders. Climbing equipment should be less than or equal to 60 inches in height for children ages 4 years old and 5 years old.

Grade School (Children in this group range in age from 5 years old to 12 years old.)
See Public Playground Safety Handbook for what equipment would be appropriate for this age group.

While it is important to have children playing in an age appropriate playground, it is also important for there to be adequate and appropriate supervision. Children often times will misuse equipment or engage in dangerous stunts. Because of the curiosity of children as well as the developing motor skills, supervision should be present at all times. Supervision of children on playgrounds should include the following:

Check the surface of the playground;

Inspect the playground for broken or damaged equipment;

Check the playground for unsafe modifications including but limited to ropes that are added to the equipment but are not part of the original design and are not provided by the manufacturer;

Removing any broken glass or other items that may cause harm to the children;

Require that the children wear appropriate foot wear; and

Keeping children in the playground area so that they do not wander away or subject to abduction by strangers.

The ABCs of Child Injury - Legal Rights of the Injured Child - What Every Parent Should Know - has chapters on Playground Injuries, Day Care Center Injuries, School Injuries, and other topics.

The book was written by David Wolf, an attorney who has dedicated his entire legal career to the protection and enforcement of the rights of children. You can get this book for free at The ABCs of Child Injury.

September 27, 2012

What If a Child Is Injured Playing on a Trampoline? What Are the Legal Rights of the Injured Child

By David Wolf, Attorney
Published by Child Injury Lawyer Network

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Trampolines are common in most every community. Many commercial play areas also have trampolines for use by children. While trampolines can provide great fun and a form of exercise for children, trampolines are also well known hazards and risks to children as well. This is especially true for young children who play on trampolines. The American Academy of Pediatrics reported that there were approximately 100,000 trampoline related personal injuries reported in 2009. The American Academy of Pediatrics has taken the position that recreational trampoline use by children is just plain dangerous. Many parents do not recognize the dangers of trampoline use until there is a serious personal injury that grabs the attention of the parents.

While there are safety measures available that supposedly make the trampoline safer for children to use, the American Academy of Pediatrics noted that the safety notes have not made much of a difference in preventing or reducing the number of trampoline related personal injuries. In fact, it is believed that the use or presence of safety nets provides parents with a false sense of security as to the use of a trampoline by a child.

Statistics show that there are a number of personal injuries sustained by children as a result of trampoline use including but not limited to concussions, traumatic brain injuries, strains, sprains, fractures, neurological injuries, and other personal injuries. Younger children (those under the age of 6 years old) are risk for injuries from trampoline use. It was reported that children under the age of 6 accounted for up to 37 % of the emergency room visits due to trampoline related injuries. You can read more about the risks and dangers of trampolines at Doctors Advise Against the Use of Trampolines by Children.

The best advice that I can provide to parents to prohibit the use of trampolines by children. While this may be seen as a drastic or unfair prohibition, it is also a wise one according to many safety advocates. If a child is permitted to use a trampoline, close supervision is recommended along with a general rule that only one child be on the trampoline at a time.

Unfortunately, children suffer serious injuries as a result of trampoline use. When a child suffers a personal injury, there may be a claim or case to pursue on behalf of the injured child if it can be shown that there was a lack of permission and / or negligence involved with the incident. Due to the dangers and risks of trampolines, permission should be obtained from the child's parent prior to trampoline play or use. If permission is allowed, there still needs to be consistent supervision by a responsible adult when a trampoline is being used by a child.

A legal action for a trampoline related personal injury has four basic elements:

1. Duty. The community center, school, day care center, homeowner, or other property owner has a duty to maintain the trampoline in good repair. Furthermore, the owner of the trampoline should obtain consent of a parent for each child using the trampoline. Supervision should be provided so that there is only one child on the trampoline at a time. Other duties may be applicable depending the State, ownership (residential or commercial), and other factors.

2. Breach of Duty. The breach of any of the above duties would provide a basis for the second element of a negligence case involving a trampoline related injury.

3. Causation. Causation refers to the link between the breach of duty and the damages (injuries). In other words, the breach of duty was the reason that the child was injured. If better safety precautions were put in place and / or followed, then the incident could have been avoided.

4. Damages. The element of damages refers to the injuries and medical bills related to the trampoline related personal injuries.

The book titled - The ABCs of Child Injury - Legal Rights of the Injured Child - What Every Parent Should Know - has chapters on Playground Injuries, School Injuries, Day Care Center Injuries, Homeowner's Insurance, and other topics. You can get this book for free at The ABCs of Child Injury.

August 9, 2012

What Are the Dangers of Trampolines and Trampoline Parks and Businesses to Children?

By David Wolf, Attorney
Published by Child Injury Lawyer Network

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Trampolines and trampoline businesses can be dangerous to children. Like other activities, it is important that safety precautions are taken and that proper supervision is in place for the children using the trampoline. Some amusement parks, theme parks, and trampoline recreation facilities have been sued due to "double jumping" which was permitted to take place. This occurs when one participant attempts to jump as one participant is landing. Some of these incidents have allegedly led to a leg fracture of a trampoline participant who was a child.

It has been reportd that over 92,000 emergency room visits were associated with trampoline injuries in 2010 according to statistics provided by the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (USCPSC). The American Academy of Pediatrics have recommended that trampolines should not be used in the home setting. This is a fairly strong statement considering the prevalence and use of trampolines in any given residential community in the United States. Medical professionals including those who are part of the American Association of Orthopedic Surgeons notes that trampoline risks and injuries increase when more than one person uses the trampoline at one time. For additional information regarding this topic - see Trampoline Park Accidents and Lawsuits.

Because of the risks and dangers associated with trampolines, it is vital that supervision and safety precautions are always taken. If a child has been injured while using a trampoline at another person's home or at a theme park, amusement park, or other location, a parent should contact a Child Injury Lawyer for advice, consultation, and legal representation.

The book titled - The ABCs of Child Injury - Legal Rights of the Injured Child - What Every Parent Should Know - has chapters on Amusement and Theme Park Injuries, Homeowner's Insurance, and other topics. You can get this book for free at The ABCs of Child Injury.

August 8, 2012

What Supervision Should Be Provided for Children on Playground Swings?

By David Wolf, Attorney
Published by Child Injury Lawyer Network

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Children enrolled in schools, day care centers, after school programs, summer camps, and other programs often spend many hours during the summer and school year playing on swings in playgrounds. Most times, playing on swings is enjoyable. Unfortunately, at times, children suffer injuries on playgrounds on or near the swing set areas.

Schools, day care centers, and other programs have a duty to timely inspect and maintain the playground equipment including the swing set area. Furthermore, supervision should be consistent and comply with local and State laws depending on the program / facility supervising the children.

Children can sustain personal injuries in or near playground swing sets as follows:

A child can become tangled in the swing;

A child can be strangulated by the swing;

A child can sustain injuries when falling off or jumping off the swing;

A child can swing into another child in front or behind the swing; and

A child can injure the feet, knees, or legs when dragging them on the ground.

Because of the known and foreseeable risks of swings, child care providers including aides, teachers, counselors, volunteers, administrators, and others should do their best to properly supervision the children using the swings or even near the swings in the playground area.

The book titled - The ABCs of Child Injury - Legal Rights of the Injured Child - What Every Parent Should Know - has chapters on Playground Injuries, School Injuries, Day Care Center Injuries, Medical Bills / Treatment, and other topics. You can get this book for free at The ABCs of Child Injury.

August 5, 2012

What Kind of Supervision Should Be Provided for Children on Playground Slides?

By David Wolf, Attorney
Published by Child Injury Lawyer Network

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At most schools and day care centers, there is a playground available for use by the children enrolled in the program. Most of these playgrounds have slides. For most children on most days, the playground slide is a location of fun and enjoyment for the children. While the slides can and should be fun, many children suffer personal injuries as a result of playground slide accidents every year. There are a number of factors to be considered when providing supervision of children using a playground slide. These factors include the following:

the type and material of the slide (metal versus plastic);

the height of the slide;

the height and type of ladder attached to the slide:

the length of the slide;

other playground equipment in the area the age;

age of the children playing on the playground;

age of the children playing on the slide;

number of supervisors on or near the playground area;

prior incidents of injuries at the playground; and

other factors.

For smaller and younger children, supervision is a must to ensure that the children are able to safely climb the steps and then safely go down the slide. Day care center and school staff members should make sure that the landing or the end of the slide is clear of any other children. Playground rules and safety measures should be explained to the children and should be followed iand enforced by day care center in school staff and administrators.

A child should not go down the slide standing, on the knees, or backwards. Furthermore they should be no jumping off the slide. Some may think that it is safer for an adult to ride tandem down the slide with the child on the adult's lap. On many slides this can be actually more dangerous. In some instances the rubber shoe of the child gets caught on the plastic slide and the weight or force of the adult behind the child causes a serious lower limb injury to the child.

If a child is been injured on a playground slide or other playground equipment, it is important that the parent or school obtain timely medical treatment. Thereafter, a parent or guardian should consult with a Child Injury Lawyer to determine the respective rights of the child in the responsibilities of the day care center or school. The book - The ABCs of Child Injury - Legal Rights of the Injured Child - What Every Parent Should Know - has chapters on Playground Injuries, School Injuries, Day Care Center Injuries, and other topcis. You can get this book for free at The ABCs of Child Injury.

July 27, 2012

What If a Child Is Injured on a Playground at a Kansas Day Care Center? Dangers of Swing Sets and Other Playground Equipment

By Joni J. Franklin, Attorney and David Wolf, Attorney
Published by Child Injury Lawyer Network

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In Kansas and other States, parents rely on day care centers to provide care and supervision of their children during the work day. In most instances, the children are cared for in a safe, clean, and loving environment. At the end of the work day, the parents pick up their children from the day care center and enjoy the rest of the evening with family. Unfortunately, on some days for some children, the day is not so enjoyable. In fact, some children even suffer serious personal injuries while under the care and supervision of a Kansas day care center. In some instances, tragedy strikes and a child dies while enrolled in a day care center. What starts out as an ordinary day for the parents, day care center, and child ends in tragedy.

In Topeka, Kansas, it was reported that a 3 year old boy died while being cared for in a residential day care program. The Shawnee County Sheriff's office responded to the scene of the incident and will be conducting an investigation to determine the cause of the incident. As part of the investigation, it is expected that the sheriff's office will consider or evaluate the supervision in place at the time of the incident and the preventability of the incident. It was reported that the 3 year old boy died when he somehow became tangled in the playground swing set.

The death of this child is certainly a tragedy for the family, friends, and community. The loss of a child is an event will have a ripple effect for years to come.

You can read more about this story at 3 Year Old Boy Dies on Playground at Residential Day Care Center.

When a child suffers an injury at a day care center, there are often many questions and issues that arise. It is often helpful to get advice in these situations from a Child Injury Lawyer. The book - The ABCs of Child Injury - Legal Rights of the Injured Child - What Every Parent Should Know - has chapters on Day Care Center Injuries, Playground Injuries, School Injuries, Theme Park and Amusement Park Injuries, and other topics, You can get this book for free at The ABCs of Child Injury.

February 27, 2012

Should a Caretaker, Babysitter, Parent, or Child Care Provider Slide Down the Playground Slide With a Child?

By David Wolf, Attorney
Published by Child Injury Lawyer Network

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Should a caretaker, babysitter, parent, or childcare provider slide down the playground slide with a child? And playgrounds in every community there're are typically slides many caregivers, babysitters daycare providers, and other adults believe that the safest thing to do is to put the child on one's lab and slide down with the child. There are some risk and dangers when an adult goes down a slide with a child on his or her lap. In particular, the rubber soul of the child's shoe gets caught or stuck on the way down the slide. As a result thereof, the child may suffer a leg injury and even a leg fracture.

Child safety advocates, pediatricians, and emergency room physicians recommend an adult stand beside the slide as the child goes down the slide to prevent these types of injuries from taking place. When a child is using a playground whether in a school, day care center, home or other location, it is important that there is consistent and timely adult supervision to watch over the child and to make sure the child is using using the playground in a safe manner. When a child is under the care of a day care center, school, after school program, or other business or government entity, as well as the supervision of a friend, neighbor, or family member, it is important that the child is provided with adequate and appropriate supervision. It is also important at the playground equipment is maintained in a safe manner and that hazards on or near the playground are removed.

When a child is injured as a result of the negligence of another person or a business or school, it is important for the parent to seek legal advice from a child injury lawyer. A parent can obtain a free consultation from a Child Injury Lawyer. The book titled is important to seek legal advice from a child injury lawyer. The book titled - The ABCs of Child Injury - Legal Rights of the Injured Child - What Every Parent Should Know - has chapters on Playground Injuries, Day Care Center Injuries, School Injuries, Damages / Compensation, and other topics. Get this book for free at The ABCs of Child Injury.

First Coast News - Jacksonville, Florida - did a story on Playground Safety. The video news story shows the dangers of playground slides and the types of injuries commonly sustained when a child rides on the lap of an adult down a playground slide. See Playground Risks and Dangers - Leg Injuries and Fractures.

December 18, 2011

West Virginia Day Care Centers - What Is Child Care Center's Duty as to Safety and Hazards Outdoors and on Playgrounds?

By Stephen New, Attorney and David Wolf, Attorney
Published by Child Injury Lawyer Network

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In West Virginia, day care centers and child care centers have a duty to provide children with a safe and clean outdoor and playground environment. Pursuant to Title 78 - Legislative Rules - Department of Health and Human Resources - Division of Human Services - Child Care Centers Licensing - Hazards - Section 20.4.C, the Child Care Center has a duty to ensure that the play area for the children are well drained and free of debris. Furthermore, the child care center shall provide an outdoor environment that is clear of hazards including pits and abandoned wells, tree roots, appliances, and all other potential hazards including heat pumps, air conditioning units and external wiring, meters and telephone boxes. These areas shall be kept inaccessible to the child. The children enrolled in a day care center shall also be protected or kept away from moving vehicles when playing outside at the child care center. In addition, the soil of the playground area shall be free from any level of toxic chemicals and substances.

August 7, 2011

Incidents of Child Eye Injuries Increase Over the Summer Months

By Robert Chaiken, Attorney & David Wolf, Attorney
Published by Child Injury Lawyer Network

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Doctors in Texas believe that incidents of child eye injuries increase during the summer months. Doctors in Permian Basin said it could be anything from the lack of adult supervision to the lack of safety eye wear that contributes to an increase of child injuries under the age of 16.

Isai Garay, 12-years-old, lost his vision in one of his eyes due to a BB Gun accident at a friend’s house. He was cleaning the gun and thought it was unloaded. Garay pulled the trigger and the be-be came out, which caused him to go legally blind in one eye. His mother, Maria Garay, said that the thought of her son not being able to see out of one eye gave her chills. Doctor Gerado Escobedo performed cataract surgery on Garay, which helped him to see again.

Garay was one of the hundreds of children that come to the clinic during the summer with eye-related injuries. Doctors said there is a five percent increase during the summer with cases involving eye injuries similar to Garay. Escobedo said that sports injuries are also reasons for eye-related injuries. He said, “Most of the time you don’t wear something until you have an eye poked out.” Fortunately, 90 percent of these eye injuries can be prevented if proper safety precautions are taken. For more information on this topic, see Child Eye Injury Increase During the Summer 7/22/11.

July 20, 2011

Georgia Day Care Centers - What Rules / Laws Apply to Playgrounds in Day Care Centers?

By Scott Zahler, Attorney and David Wolf, Attorney
Published by Child Injury Lawyer Network

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Pursuant to Rule 591-1-1-.26 - Playgrounds - of the Georgia Rules and Regulations for Child Care Learning Centers, child care centers must meet certain criteria and requirements. First and foremost, the outdoor area must larger the center's licensed capacity for children, specifically the area shall be equal to 100 square feet times 1/3 the center's capacity. Each center is required to provide 100 square feet for each child occupying the outside play area at any one time, groups of children may be rotated if necessary. The play area shall be adjacent to the child care center, or in an area that is accessible by a safe route or other approved method. However, school-age centers shall have shaded areas. The play areas shall also be protected by a fence or other secure barrier, which is 4 feet or higher. Child care centers must keep the play areas clean, so as to be free from litter and hazards ("free from hazards" can mean but is not limited to non-resilient surfaces under the fall-zaon of play equipment, exposed tree roots and exposed sharp edges of concrete or equipment. The equipment shall be age appropriate and provide the children at the center with various opportunities and engage in a variety of experiences. The outdoor equipment must be free from lead-based paint, sharp corners and be checked regularly to maintain safety.

When a child is abused or injured in a Georgia Day Care Center, it can be quite challenging for a parent to deal with the aftermath, stress, and trauma of such injuries to the child. The book titled The ABCs of Child Injury - Legal Rights of the Injured Child - What Every Parent Should Know - contains chapters on Child Abuse, School Injuries, Day Care Injuries, Damages / Compensation, and other topics. You can receive a free book on Child Injury Questions and Issues. The book is also available on the following websites: Amazon, Barnes & Noble, and the Apple iBookstore.

June 6, 2011

Strong Winds and Bounce Houses - Dangerous Combination Leads to Personal Injuries in

By Steven Smith, Attorney, and David Wolf, Attorney
Published by Child Injury Lawyer Network

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In Long Island, New York, three bounce houses went airborne after some strong winds lifted up the bounce houses at a soccer tournament. The incident took place at the Town of Oceanside (Long Island) New York at the United Soccer Club. Bounce houses can be susceptible to strong winds and thereby create a zone of danger when the bounce houses are not properly secured in place. When operating or renting a bounce house, it is important to read the weather forecast. Furthermore, it is also important to monitor the weather forecast and weather reports during the time that the bounce house is in place. While bounce houses are typically fun for children, safety is a priority at all times. It was reported that 13 people were injured as a result of this bounce house incident. See 13 Injured WHen Bounce Houses Go Airborne in New York.

The book titled - The ABCs of Child Injury - Legal Rights of the Injured Child - has chapters on Playground Injuries, Medical Bills / Medical Treatment, Damages / Compensation and other topics. You can receive a free copy of this book at Free Child Injury Book for Parents - Answers to Many Common Questions When a Child Is Injured. The book is also available at Amazon, Barnes & Noble, and the Apple iBookstore.

May 24, 2011

Church Stabbing After Basketball Game in Georgetown Area

By David Wolf, Attorney Published by Child Injury Lawyer Network

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Marquise Bessllieu, 17, a Georgetown High School (South Carolina) basketball player is recovering after being stabbed outside Georgetown Presbyterian Church. Police arrested the attacker who was later identified as 24-year-old Maliek Gibbs. Bassllieu first encountered Gibbs during the basketball game when Gibbs took the basketball. A few minutes later Gibbs stabbed Bessellieu in the abdomen outside in the parking lot.

Bessllieu had surgery and his family said he is recovering from his injuries. He is expected to face 6 weeks of recovery time and will likely miss the remainder of the school year. Gibbs faced a judge last Friday and was given a $25,000 bond. If the State pursues charges against Gibbs, he will be entitled to the services of a Louisiana criminal defense lawyer or the services of the local public defender's office. An arrest does not automatically mean that there will be a plea deal or a conviction.

Allowing your child to get involved in extracurricular activities outside of school is a wise choice, and it can be very important in helping them to develop many working skills, people skills, and more. However, Louisiana parents should make sure that the activity is taking place in a safe environment with adult supervision. For more informatoin on this story, see Player stabbed after basketball game at church.

April 5, 2011

Two Children Injured in Arizona Bounce House - Legal Rights of Injured Children and Legal Responsibilities of Bounce House Owner / Operator

By Sara J. Powell, Attorney and David Wolf, Attorney
Published by Child Injury Lawyer Network

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In Arizona and other States, children enjoy playing in bounce houses and jumping castles. Unfortunately, on some occasions, children suffer serious personal injuries while jumping in or just occupying a bounce house. In Pima County, Arizona, a terrible incident was reported in which a bounce house described as a jumping castle was lifted 15 feet in the air by a dust devil and blew the inflatable structure across three lanes of traffic before landing on the ground. The Tuscon Arizona Fire Department responded to the scene of the accident. It was reported that a boy and a girl were inside the bounce house at the time of the incident and suffered serious personal injuries.

There may be liability for the injuries suffered by these children depending on the additional facts that may be obtained from the police department, fire department, and / or investigators who review the scene or the information regarding the incident. The following issues should be reviewed:

What kind of anchoring was used for the bounce house?

What kind of anchoring was recommended by the manufacturer?

How well was the bounce house and anchoring equipment maintained?

What did the weather forecast call for at the time of the incident?

What kind of warning or notice was available as to the weather?

What kind of supervision was provided for the children in the bounce house?

Was the incident avoidable?

Were additional anchoring techniques or tools available to make the inflatable structure more secure?

You can read more about this story at 2 Kids Injured in Arizona Jumping Castle Accident.

November 14, 2010

Tragic Accident at Oklahoma Fairgrounds - Legal Rights and Responsibilities

By Roy S. Dickinson, Attorney and David Wolf, Attorney
Published by Child Injury Lawyer Network

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In Oklahoma, a tragic fairground accident was report where a child died and 4 others suffered personal injuries. The accident involved a barrel ride which was described as an ATV (All Terrain Vehicle) towing barrels that children / riders occupied. During the ride, the 55 gallon barrels overturned. Authorities reported that the an 8 year old girl was later pronounced dead at Marietta Hospital from personal injuries related to this incident. The Oklahoma Highway Patrol (OHP) identified the girl as Jaylen Wolf of Marietta, Oklahoma. You can read about this story at Girl (Jaylen Wolf) Dies as a Result of Oklahoma Fairground Accident - Barrel Ride Overturns.

News report did not provide details of whether the ride was manufactured by a company or manufactured by an individual. It would be important to determine what kind of safety tests and inspections were completed prior to having guests / children use the ride. Were the barrels susceptible to tipping? What kind of safety measures were put in place (if any) to deal with a tipping barrel? What speed was the ATV going at the time of the incident? Was the terrain a factor in causing the barrels to tip over?

Fairgrounds can be sites of great fun. As you can see here, fairgrounds can also be sites of horrible tragedy and serious personal injuries.

The design, operation, and inspection of the barrel ride system will be pertinent to both the homicide or death investigation by authorities. These issues are also important should the personal injury victims and their families pursue a civil case for the damages / injuries sustained as a result of this incident.

Injuries sustained at a theme park or fairground are often times serious and quite difficult for a family to deal with from the practical, medical, psychological, finanical, and, yes, legal standpoint. You can read more about Theme Park and Fairground Injuries as well as other topics in the book titled - The ABCs of Child Injury - Legal Rights of the Injured Child - What Every Parent Should Know. You can request a free copy of the book by clicking here.

October 29, 2010

Child Suffers Serious Head Injury from Fall from Hayloft in Michigan

By Mark Freedman, Attorney and David Wolf, Attorney
Published by Child Injury Lawyer Network

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A 3-year-old child was injured in Montcalm County, Michigan after falling in the child's family barn. According to officers, the child was playing inside the barn when he feel 8 to 10 feet onto a cement floor. According to police, the 3-year-old sustained a serious head injury. The young boy was transported by helicopter to a hospital in Grand Rapids, Michigan. He is listed in serious condition. Deputies have ruled this incident an accident. If you would like to read more on this story please see 3-year-old falls from family barn sustains serious head injury.

Young children like 3 year olds often times do not appreciate or recognize the dangers of heights. As such, young children are at risk for injury when playing on or standing on an elevated area. When children are on elevated areas, it is important to have railings and other safety equipment for the protection of children. Supervision is also key to preventing tragic child injuries. Of course, it is difficult to prevent all injuries from occurring. However, simple safety measures and supervision can help avoid many unfortunate incidents from taking place.

While a child's fall from a hayloft may not be that common, injuries sustained in playgrounds In Michigan and other States are quite common. The same principles of safety measures, safety equipment, and supervision apply to playgrounds. Typically, playgrounds typically have a number of elevated platforms. For young children, the elevated platforms can be quite fun but also quite dangerous. Make sure that the playground is age appropriate for your child and designed in a way that provides for the safety of your child. Always maintain good supervision when your child is in a playground area. Maintaining supervision over a child while he or she is playing will decrease the likelihood that he or she will fall and sustain personal injuries because you, as a supervisor, will be able to quickly spot when the child has climbed too high, is running too fast, or is otherwise engaging in risky behavior on play equipment. Another way to prevent children from sustaining person injuries is to check the play equipment for its condition and safety before allowing children to play on the equipment. If you would like to read more safety tips concerning playground hazards please read Playground Hazards - What Parents, Teachers, Day Care Providers and Others Can Do to Help Prevent Child Personal Injuries on Playgrounds?.

October 26, 2010

Montana Church Camp - Collapse of Climbing Walls Injures Children

By Will Lewis, Attorney and David Wolf, Attorney
Published by Child Injury Lawyer Network

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Rock climbing and wall climbing are very popular activities for children. When participating in these activities, safety is a must. The wall should be securely anchored and all children should wear harnesses. In addition, adult supervision is key to keeping children safe. It is well known that children do not always appreciate the dangers of a particular activity. As such, adult supervision is necessary not only for instruction but also to make sure that children do not venture into areas or stunts that can lead to serious personal injuries.

In Lakeside, Montana, the Associated Press reported that a climbing wall collapsed at a church camp. The incident resulted in 8 children being treating at a local hospital. Injuries included fractured bones and bruising.

It was reported that the wall was 8 feet long. There were no details as to what safety measures were put in place at this climbing wall. While some incidents are completely unexpected and cannot be foreseen, many incidents involving injuries to children can be avoided with attention to detail as to the set up of the wall and as to the supervision of children on the wall or apparatus. You can read more about this story at Montana Church - Climbing Wall Collapse Leads to Injuries.

October 24, 2010

Oversight of Playground Injuries in Oklahoma - Child Injuries

By Roy S. Dickinson, Attorney and David Wolf, Attorney
Published by Child Injury Lawyer Network

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In Oklahoma and other States, there are concerns about the lack of consistent and accurate date regarding playground incidents and accidents. Children are frequently injured on playgrounds at schools, day care centers, parks, community centers, and homes. Many experts believe that it would be helpful to have some kind of reporting system or data bank set up for the reporting of playground incidents resulting in personal injuries to children. By having such data in place, it could help designers and manufacturers make the playground equipment more safe for children. The information would also be helpful to teachers, day care providers, and child care providers who provide the day to day supervision of children on playgrounds. While not all injuries can be prevented on playgrounds, many such injuries can be prevented if we know why and how children are injured on playgrounds. You can read more about this topic at Oklahoma Playground Injury Oversight Sought

 
 
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